Ward Kelley’s Blog

Poem Inspired by the song “Middles”

Her soul touches me
down to the Middle of my core
Is there more to the Universe
than the middle of her soul?

Her soul is more to me
than I see in the Middle
of Humanity’s combined souls.

Read On….

Play Middles

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She Wrestled an Angel A song by Entrance Way

“Our protagonist wonders if it were possible to physically engage with an angel. Two problems present themselves here: where does one find an angel, and then wouldn’t his strength overpower her? She solves both problems in the song.”

Play She Wrestled An Angel

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Annie Easily Unraveled Poem – About Anne Sexton

Anne Sexton (1928-1974) was an American poet known for her unadulterated chronicling of intimate and socially taboo subjects. She won the Pulitzer in 1967 for “Love or Die,” and gave her answer to that title in 1974 with her death by her own hand. She once wrote of frequent drinking dates at the Ritz with Sylvia Plath: “Often, very often, Sylvia and I would talk at length about our first suicides; at length, in detail, and in depth between the free potato chips. Suicide is, after all, the opposite of a poem.”

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Doc Holliday Books and Song

Books and song related to Doc Holliday. John Henry Holliday (1851-1887), known throughout the West as Doc Holliday ,was born in Georgia and educated as a dentist in Pennsylvania. Diagnosed with tuberculosis in 1873 and given only a half-year to live, he moved west, hoping to extend his life a few months in the dry climate. Already condemned to a slow, painful death, Holliday knew no fear in dangerous situations, and his fame grew; he teamed up with the Earp brothers during the gunfight at the O.K. Corral, and many historians place the amount of men he killed in the 30s. The only fellow Georgian Holliday continued to contact after he went west was his cousin, Mattie Holliday. Shortly after Doc contracted tuberculosis and left Georgia, Mattie too left their childhood world to become a Sister of Charity, entering an Atlanta convent. No correspondence between the two has survived, but it’s safe to say she had a profound impact on Doc, in that even though he had been raised a Presbyterian, it was revealed after his death at Glenwood Springs, Colorado, that he had recently been baptized in the Catholic faith.

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Faith Must Stay Alive Doc Holliday Poem

John Henry Holliday (1851-1887), known throughout the West as Doc Holliday,was born in Georgia and educated as a dentist in Pennsylvania.  Diagnosed with tuberculosis in 1873 and given only a half-year to live, he moved west, hoping to extend his life a few months in the dry climate.  Already condemned to a slow, painful death, Holliday knew no fear in dangerous situations, and his fame grew;  he teamed up with the Earp brothers during the gunfight at the O.K. Corral, and many historians place the amount of men he killed in the 30s.  The only fellow Georgian Holliday continued to contact after he went west was his cousin, Mattie Holliday. Shortly after Doc contracted tuberculosis and left Georgia, Mattie too left their childhood world to become a Sister of Charity, entering an Atlanta convent. No correspondence between the two has survived, but it’s safe to say she had a profound impact on Doc, in that even though he had been raised a Presbyterian, it was revealed after his death at Glenwood Springs, Colorado, that he had recently been baptized in the Catholic faith.

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Persian invader Xerxes Video and Song Lyrics

Where there’s no evidence this is a true story, it certainly could be one. Xerxes slayed hundreds of thousands of Greeks during his invasion of the democracies, so it’s not a stretch to imagine a wealthy land owner making a suicidal stand against the invaders. This song has it roots in a poem I published 20 or so years ago, by the same name; I guess I felt compelled by the situation and the thoughts running through the protagonist’s mind as he stood in a small temple at night on his property, in a thunderstorm, knowing Xerxes and his murderous army waited over the next hill.

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Pushing, Pushing Poem about Judy Garland

Judy Garland was the assumed name of Frances Gumm (1922-1969). She made her stage debut at age three, spent several years in vaudeville, then at thirteen signed with MGM. She made many memorable movies, most famous of which was “The Wizard of Oz,” where she played a role originally intended for Shirley Temple. Garland’s personal life was usually in turmoil.

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Thou Has Nor Youth Nor Age Poem S. Eliot (1888-1965)

S. Eliot (1888-1965) was arguably the most influential poet of the 20th century. Born in St. Louis, Missouri, Eliot was educated at Harvard, but then moved to England where he became a British citizen in 1927. Best known for his poems “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” and “The Waste Land,” Eliot was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1948. According to Eliot’s instructions, his tomb was engraved with the phrase, “in the beginning is my end, in the end is my beginning.” The title of the above poem was taken from the dedication to his poem “Gerontion.”

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The Ancient Heart of Sandy – Sandy Denny

Sandy Denny (1947-1978), English folk singer, died tragically at a young age when she fell down the steps at a friend’s home and went immediately into a coma. She passed away four days later. One of the many songs she penned was an instrumental she co-authored, “The Lord Is In This Place, How Dreadful Is This Place.”

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Election Song 2016

With Anastasia’s deep roots in Indiana, we wanted to write a song about the Midwestern state, and while thinking about all the images to describe Indiana – the farmlands, rural towns, basketball, industrialized cities – one overarching thing became clear. There is a powerful, nearly overwhelming, love of country here in the heartland, transcending all else. A quick look at the news, and the verses nearly wrote themselves.

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A Compelling, Haunting Tale from Ward Kelley – Amazon review by S. Russell

DIVINE MURDER draws the reader ever deeper into a spellbinding web of mystery. It is sheer escapism yet with a disturbing plausibility and philosophical logic underpinning each strange twist of the tale. The two central characters are well-developed, especially Zoe, who is a strong and resourceful woman, always one jump ahead of her husband in unraveling the truth behind everything that happens on her journey with him. I thoroughly recommend this compelling story concerning the divine, the diabolical and the struggles of two mortals to discover their momentous destiny.

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Lyricist thoughts on Contessa of the Willows by Entrance Way

Read the lyrics of the song, along with the lyricist’s thoughts about the song. Understand the meaning and the depth of the song by reading the lyricist’s motivations for writing it.  In Contessa of the Willows the singer explores the stressed relationship he has with a woman who constantly seeks to find sadness in her otherwise happy circumstances. He loves her greatly, but …. read on

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Reincarnation Themed Music and Lyrics

As the lyricist of all the songs on the CD, I must admit I rarely miss a chance to weave Reincarnation references into my lyrics. But three songs in particular deal with Reincarnation directly.  Where there’s no scientific proof for Reincarnation, or for any other theology for that matter, the Ian Stevenson books come the closest so far as documenting cases of Reincarnation he directly studied. But a scientist to the end, Stevenson can’t bring himself to claim he’s proven the existence of Reincarnation, although his case studies are extremely compelling.

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New Songs Week of 9 -12-2016 by Entrance and Anastasia

Our first new song this week is “Jesus & the Budda” by Entrance. The band Entrance is comprised of Jeff Stafford, Lee Dalson, Papa Boyd’O, Anastasia Shields and Ward Kelley. Their vision is to create and explore non-commercial rock platforms while drawing from the poetry of Ward Kelley. Their scope includes rock, psychedelia, folk, blues, and even a little classical.

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A Ka Inside a Pyramid Poem – Ramose circa 1350 BCE

A Ka Inside a Pyramid Ramose circa 1350 BCE.
My heart floats in the ibis jar on top
my brains and liver, all my organs mixed
together like a fetal mass . . .

and so I am back
at the womb, a time when my interior ingredients
floated indistinguishable from my exterior.

When I gain another chance at breathing,
I think I will create a creature
whose interior thoughts are more visible
to its fellows, for I now understand
most strife between us breathing ones
comes from misread intentions.   READ ON

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The Emperor Decides to Kill Catherine – Poem about Catherine of Alexandria

Read “The Emperor Decides to Kill Catherine” poem offered in the post.

Authors Notes about The Emperor Decides to Kill Catherine: Catherine of Alexandria, (circa 213?), was a Roman Catholic saint, whose beauty so impressed the Roman Emperor Maximian that he offered to overlook her refusal to sacrifice to the gods if she would only submit to his desires. Catherine rejected his overtures, saying she was already the bride of Christ, and even converted the fifty philosophers Maximian convened to change her mind. The emperor beheaded the philosophers, then attempted to have Catherine broken on a spiked wheel, however it miraculously shattered. Instead Maximian had her beheaded, yet when he did, milk flowed from her severed neck. Where this tale was highly popular in the medieval West, most historians think it is probable Catherine never existed. Joan of Arc, though, did not concur with such skeptics; Catherine was one of the three saints Joan claimed appeared to her to offer advice in her military endeavors.

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What is Free Jango Radio?

How can it be free? Instead of forcing the listeners to purchase a package deal in order to avoid having to listen to annoying advertisements, Jango allows independent and small music studios to purchase radio air time. Jango then makes listening free, at the “price” of listening to new artists between your favorite songs instead of listening to ads. Jango even allows you to pick the type of music you’d prefer to hear by the independent artists.

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About Yehuda Amichai with helpful links.

Poet Yehuda Amichai was an Israeli poet. He was married twice and had two sons and one daughter. As a young man he volunteered and fought in World War II as a member of the British Army, and in the Negev on the southern front in the Israeli War of Independence. He died of cancer in 2000, at age 76. Many people, worldwide, regarded Amichai as Israel’s greatest modern poet. He was also one of the first to write in colloquial Hebrew.

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New Release Enfold Folk Album.

Enfold Album is Ward Kelley owner of Wardco Studios newest release.

Enfolds is available for download at Enfold Ward Kelley Artist.

Enfold is a contemporary folk album by Joan in the Fires, featuring Jessie Doyle. It combines the lyrics of poet Ward Kelley with imaginative melodies to produce a truly unique folk listening experience.

15 songs take the listener on a voyage through a Wild Mouse amusement park ride to the poets Sylvia Plath and Emily Dickinson to the Book of Proverbs to ancient Rome and finally to the Secret of Life, a tongue-in-cheek look at the world’s religion where the singer laments she is theologically abused. Interspaced throughout the album are new but more conventional folk songs and topics.

One thing is for certain, the listener will come away with a unique folk experience!

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The Wild Mouse Roller Coaster Song

The Wild Mouse Song: The singer imagines the boundary between life and death as an amusement park ride, then conjectures communicating with ‘little dead souls.’

A Wild Mouse roller coaster (also Mad Mouse or Crazy Mouse) is a type of roller coaster characterized by small cars that seat four people or fewer and ride on top of the track, taking tight, flat turns (without banking) at modest speeds, yet producing high lateral G-forces. The track work is characterized by many turns and bunny hops, the latter producing abrupt negative vertical G forces.

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Gypsy’s Daughter Enters the Third Reich

The Gypsy’s Daughter Enters the Third Reich Synopsis

Sometimes overlooked in discussions of the Holocaust are the conditions of the Gypsies, or Roma, who were subjected to the same attempt at genocide by the Nazi. Over 200,000 Gypsies lost their lives in the Holocaust. This song is the story of a Gypsy father and his nine year old daughter, as they are led towards the ovens in Auschwitz. The lyricist, the poet Ward Kelley, says, “these lyrics came from the saddest poem I ever published, but I thought it important the story of this small family was told. The poem, named the same as the song, was later nominated for the Pushcart award, and became one of my most reprinted poems. Still, I must admit, it’s difficult for me to read or contemplate this story.”

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